Overview

 

OVERVIEW

 

Millennium Development Goals. The project directly addresses the U.N. Millennium Development Goals, in particular, the goals to “eradicate extreme poverty and hunger,” “combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases” and “create a global partnership for development.”

New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD). The project supports the “long-term vision of an African-owned and African-led development programme,” as outlined in the African Union’s New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD).

 

PAHF's first project was the establishment of an auto-disable (AD) syringe factory at Ozuoba-Obio (Akpor Local Government Area), near the city of Port Harcourt in Rivers State, Federal Republic of Nigeria. The factory was completed in mid-2009.

From a humanitarian viewpoint, this factory has been greatly needed. AD syringes, which use an automatic-locking device, de-activate after a single use and thus prevent re-use. Syringe re-use can transmit blood-borne pathogens — each year in the developing world, leading to a combined total of more than 25 million new infections of HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C and other diseases. The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified AD syringes as the preferred method for preventing syringe re-use and has cited issues of cost and availability as factors preventing their more-widespread use.

The factory is producing about 160 million AD syringes each year: meeting about 20% of Nigeria's total requirement. The factory is run on a not-for-profit basis, so the syringes are sold at prices just sufficient to cover operating costs and otherwise ensure continuous production. Thus, the factory operates on a self-sustaining basis. AD syringes will continue to be available and affordable well into the future; and syringe-transmitted infections are expected to drop proportionately.

The project’s numerous other positive impacts include the following:

Local jobs and skills training: The factory has 300-plus employees, all local people.

Transfer of technology — principally, the Star K1 AD syringe — to Africa.

Beneficial use of local raw materials and other locally-available resources.

And increased local self-reliance.


View project photos and other highlights here.

 
Updated: December 3, 2009.
 

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